From July 11 to 28, the Robert Mazlo endowment fund for art and contemporary art jewellery partners with Le Arti Orafe - Florence and Arketip to host the works of the three winners of the Preziosa Young 2019 award.

Since 2008 PREZIOSA YOUNG is the international competition reserved to young goldsmiths, designers and artisans, with the only limitation of not having 35 years of age.

For each edition, a highly qualified jury selects a small number of participants who are rewarded with an exhibition and the publication of a catalogue.

This year,  PREZIOSA YOUNG received 147 applications from all over the world: lots of candidates, and a lot of work for the jury, which this year consisted of :

Maria Cristina Bergesio, art critic, curator, teacher.
Tasso Mattar, artist and curator.
Maria Rosa Franzin, artist and teacher.
Robert Mazlo, artist and gallerist (La Joaillerie par Mazlo), Paris.
Irene Belfi, gallerist (Irene Belfi Gallery), Milan.

THE WINNERS


YAJIE HU

Born in China in 1993, lives and works in Florence, Italy.

 

As an artist, I am naturally attracted to colour and texture, as well as art as a tangible, wearable object. I investigate the colours, textures and shapes of some interesting objects in nature, such as animals and plants. I also study the attractiveness of striking colour combinations that are found in the natural world. These interests have inspired me to create my jewellery collections. I primarily work with acrylic paint as my ideas are best expressed through it. Working with acrylic paint allows me to be in direct contact with colour. I therefore not only investigate its visual qualities but also explore it as a useable material. At the same time, my designs are based on organic forms, which are then transformed and designed into my own aesthetic pieces. I aim for my designs to be worn on the body, but also to be valued as art objects.

KOEN JACOBS

Born in 1989 in the Netherlands, lives and works in Amsterdam.

 

I am fascinated by the memories that jewellery can carry and have created a series of playful animal skeletons, which bring my childhood memories to life. As a child I have lived for 3,5 years in Brazil, where I developed a huge fascination for wild animals. My childhood drawings from that time, show a magnificent fuse of reality and fantasy and inspired me to develop playful animal skeletons. Through prototypes I have studied how movements can be achieved in the best way. The result is a series of animal marionettes, which can trigger childhood memories and evoke the playful child in each of us, by pulling the silver chains. Other pieces show their playfulness through the way of wearing, like the Camaleão sitting on the shoulder or the two Jacaré brooches, whereby you wear one part in the front and one in the back, creating the image of being pierced by a crocodile.
Just as the passage of time gives layering to nature, my skeletons are in a process of change. Each piece is partly overgrown by layers of natural- and artificial materials, such as tiny sea shells, beads and fragmented minerals, creating new crystal structures around the silver skeletons.
For children, every day is a new journey of discovery and they marvel at the little things around them. As an adult we have often lost the ability to take an uninhibited fresh view upon daily life. I hope my work helps you to bring back some of that.

JONGSEOK LIM

Born in 1987 in Pyeongtaek, lives and works in Republic of Korea.


In our daily life insects might be too petty to grab our attention. Unknowingly, however, we have a close relationship with them which has a far-reaching effect on our lives. When I was young, insects were an object that stirred my curiosity and their peculiar shape left a strong impression on me. Now, as an adult they are a means to bring back my childhood memories.
Their impressive appearance is a result of their inevitable evolution in order to coexist with the changing environments of today. Insects are evolving to survive in a fast transforming ecosystem. The glittering covers and antennae armed with chitin, translucent wings, and the interesting shape of each fragilely thin joint become my own language of formative arts.
These insect shape's are expressed with filigree.
Filigree is a technique that repeats lines tens or hundreds of times, to make my desired shape and the main theme of my thesis. Lines of a fine thread all together show a unique pattern and texture and the scale of the plane produced gives a special visual impression as the scale is as big as an insect.  
The insect made with metal reminds viewers of very private but universal memories and makes new interpretations and messages. I hope that the result of my work will create intriguing images and at the same time serve as an attractive object.

PARTNERS